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Time: 10:00 am, March 29th 2013.
Location: Litochoro, on the east coast of Greece.
Equipment: Bike, running shoes, crampons, ski equipment and high mountain gear
Athletes: Benedikt Böhm, Schorsch Nickaes, Patrick Jost.
The project: From the sea to Mount Olympus, the highest mountain in Greece, and back again in less than seven hours. "By fair means" - that means with all the equipment needed on your back or under your feet.

Take a dip in the sea in the morning, and five hours later ski down from the 2,918-metre Mytikas peak of Mount Olympus – this was what the DYNAFIT sports people planned to accomplish at the end of March.

Benedikt Böhm, International CEO with the ski touring specialists, Product Manager Schorsch Nickaes, and our long-standing partner Patrick Jost of Hindelanger Mountain Guide Services, began a race against the clock by bike, on foot, and on skis. The programme included a speed ascent, a hike across alpine terrain, and a ski descent from the summit. The plan also included a visit to the highest mountain in Greece, home of the gods and seat of Zeus in Greek mythology. In this unique project, the speed climbers travel from Poseidon to Zeus. They set off from sea level, where according to mythology Poseidon rules the waves.

The three experienced skiers set off on their bikes from the beach in the pouring rain at 10 in the morning. 25 kilometres later and 1,100 metres higher they reached Prionia lodge. They swapped over to running shoes, and later again at the snow line swapped the shoes for skis to get across the Muse Plateau en route to the summit. After four hours they reached Kakalos lodge (2,648 m) where they were forced to stop for the night due to the unstable snow conditions. The next morning they reached the main summit of Olympus at 2,918 metres in only 40 minutes of "speed ascending". They descended from the summit on ski down a steep 45 degree gully, through 300 metres of vertical descent.

The team arrived back at the beach having completed a total of 3,260 vertical metres of ascent/descent through 68 kilometres, all in less than seven hours on the move. The first thing they did was jump into the sea to cool off.

A unique project which was supported by the DYNAFIT team in Greece. Many thanks to all!